Posts tagged 'vim'

Import custom Python modules in Vim plugins

published on June 16, 2016.
Heads-up! You're reading an old post and the information in it is quite probably outdated.

This took me a while to figure out so I’m writing it down for future self and anyone else who needs it.

I started writing a new Vim plugin that will use the Python interface as most of the work will be done there, mostly to keep my sanity.

Having a plugin layout such as:

.
├── lib
│   └── mypymodule
│       └── ham.py
└── plugin
    └── my-vim-plugin.vim

I want to be able to do a

from mypymodule import ham

from within the my-vim-plugin.vim file.

For that to happen the <sfile> command line special comes to rescue. It is the file name of the sourced file in Vim, that is, the file name of the Vim plugin. Using the :p and :h file name modifiers it gives us the full path to the plugin directory of our plugin.

" This will give something like
" /home/robert/projects/my-vim-plugin/plugin
let g:plugin_path = expand('<sfile>:p:h')

And here comes the kicker: the <sfile> needs to be expanded outside of our Vim function where it is used, otherwise the <sfile> points to the path of the file that called the Vim function.

In code, getting the path to the sourced file from within the Vim function would be incorrect:

" ./plugin/my-vim-plugin.vim
function! MyVimPlugin()
python << endpython

import vim

vim.command("let a:plugin_path = expand('<sfile>:p:h')
plugin_path = vim.eval("a:plugin_path")
print plugin_path

endpython
endfunction

because it would end up printing the current working directory from where the MyVimPlugin function is called.

The correct way to do is to get the path to the sourced file outside of the Vim function:

" ./plugin/my-vim-plugin.vim
let g:plugin_path = expand('<sfile>:p:h')

function! MyVimPlugin()
python << endpython

import vim

vim.command("let a:plugin_path = expand('<sfile>:p:h')
plugin_path = vim.eval("a:plugin_path")
print plugin_path

endpython
endfunction

This way the path is set at the time the plugin is sourced and not at the time when function is called.

Finally, to be able to import the mypymodule from the lib, we need to point to the lib directory and add it to the system paths. Complete example:

" ./plugin/my-vim-plugin.vim
let g:plugin_path = expand('<sfile>:p:h')

function! MyVimPlugin()
python << endpython

import os
import sys
import vim

" Get the Vim variable to Python
plugin_path = vim.eval("g:plugin_path")
" Get the absolute path to the lib directory
python_module_path = os.path.abspath('%s/../lib' % (plugin_path))
" Append it to the system paths
sys.path.append(python_module_path)

" And import!
from mypymodule import ham

endpython
endfunction

By the way, here’s the documentation for the Vim Python module.

Happy hackin’!

Tags: vim, python, plugin.
Categories: Programming, Development.

Vim Hugo helper

published on March 25, 2016.
Heads-up! You're reading an old post and the information in it is quite probably outdated.

I think I just wrote my first Vim plugin. OK, it’s more a bunch of Vim functions slapped together than an actual plugin, but gotta start somewhere, right?

Last week I converted this blog to a static web site and I’m using Hugo as the static website engine. Writing posts is a lot easier now, plus it’s written in Go, which I started learning a few weeks ago.

Vim Hugo helper is a plugin, collection of Vim functions that help me while writing posts. It will hopefully speed up a few recurring tasks such as drafting and undrafting posts, inserting code highlight blocks, etc. I guess I’ll be adding more to it in the future, but for now it has a total of 5 functions.

Front matter reorder

Hugo posts have a front matter which is basically meta data for the content. Hugo will create the front matter out of an archetype which is a template of sorts for the front matter. One thing I don’t like is that when a new post is created, the meta data is sorted alphabetically so the HugoHelperFrontMatterReorder function reorders it in the way that I do like.

Drafting/undrafting posts

The HugoHelperDraft and HugoHelperUndraft functions simply draft and undraft posts by setting the draft meta data in the front matter to either true or false.

Code highlight blocks

The HugoHelperHighlight(‘language’) function inserts the highlight shortcode that comes built-in with Hugo and sets the language of the highlight block.

Setting the date of the post

Finally, the HugoHelperDateIsNow function sets the date meta data of the post to the current date and time.

It’s not much, definitely has room for improvements, but I used it even when writing this very post, so I guess this helper is helpful.

Tags: vim, plugin, hugo.
Categories: Programming, Development.

Tags for PHP in Vim

published on March 09, 2016.
Heads-up! You're reading an old post and the information in it is quite probably outdated.

One thing I was missing for a long time in Vim is to be able to “jump to definition” in an easy and painless way.

The other thing I wanted to improve is to be able to tell easily where am I actually in the code base; to see the current class and method name of wherever the cursor was.

With a bit of googling and poking around, I finally came up with a perfect combo of 5 plugins (yep, five!) that enables me to do both, and a little bit of extra.

Tags made easy

Gutentags  is a brilliant Vim plugin that makes it so easy to have tags. Just install the plugin and boom! Tags! It will figure out things on it’s own and just generate the tags in the background. I use it daily for a fairly large code base and I never had any problems with the tags, or with Vim being unresponsive while the tags are being generated.

The only two settings I have set for it is what to exclude and where to store the tag files to not pollute the current project with them.

let g:gutentags_exclude = ['*.css', '*.html', '*.js']
let g:gutentags_cache_dir = '~/.vim/gutentags'

That’s it.

Jump to definition

Pair gutentags with CtrlP and it’s CtrlPTag method and we get jump to definition.

map <silent> <leader>jd :CtrlPTag<cr><c-\>w

Move to the method name we’re interested in, hit <leader>jd and it will jump to it’s definition. Tip: <C->w means “insert word under cursor”.

Where the hell am I?

My second requirement for displaying the current class and method name was a bit more difficult to fulfill. It takes the tagbar, tagbar-phpctags and lightline plugins as well as the phpctags tag generator to accomplish that.

Let the tagbar plugin know where the phpctags bin is:

let g:tagbar_phpctags_bin='~/.vim/phpctags'

This will make the tagbar plugin use phpctags to generate tags for the current file. To finally display the current tag in lightline, I wrote a simple tagbar component for it:

'tagbar': '%{tagbar#currenttag("[%s]", "", "f")}'

My complete lightline settings at the time of writing this can be found here.

Vimprovements

published on March 26, 2015.
Heads-up! You're reading an old post and the information in it is quite probably outdated.

One part where I always felt (and still feel) that I could improve on my Vim usage, is when moving around. I don’t use the mouse, I don’t use the arrow keys, but for a while now I felt that spamming hjkl to get from one place to another is not really efficient. To be honest, it is kind of easy to just press down jjjjjjj … to move down lines. Went a bit too far? Just kk back. But there has to be a better way.

First off, I installed vim-hardtime to break the habit of spamming hjkl. That plugin limits the number of times one can press hjkl in a set time frame. I have it set up to block me from moving for a second after pressing the same motion twice in a row. jj is OK, but if I want to do jjj, well…

And this gets annoying. I want to edit code, not sit around and wait!

Faster moving around

I know about relative line numbers. I tried using them. And I guess my brain is just not wired in such a way that I could find relative numbers easy to use.

The second plugin I installed is vim-easymotion. It is supposed to make moving around in Vim much easier. There’s a lot of stuff going on in there, it has a lot of features. For now, I use 2 bits from it - jump to anywhere with s and k and j to move in lines up and down. I especially like these in visual mode, makes selecting text real nice.

I started using : more to jump to specific lines, f and F to search on the current line, { and } to move in paragraphs. I’m also more comfortable with general search with / and ?.

One other pair of commands that help me reduce spamming jk is u and d to scroll the window up and down.

Faster working with files

The third plugin I installed is CtrlP. I stumbled upon it in a /r/vim thread and decided to try it out. Up until then I was using NERDTree exclusively to navigate around files and I can’t really remember when was the last time I hit n to open it since I have CtrlP. It’s just amazing to work with files now.

NERDTree still has it’s use cases, for example in a project where I don’t really know what files are in there, but for projects on which I work frequently… Oh boy! Wonderful stuff.

I left the default p for searching for files, but remapped <tab> to open CtrlP’s find buffer mode.

Misc

Other stuff I did to make working in Vim more comfortable…

I set leader to be . I had it as , for a long while, but realised that it’s to close on the keyboard to the . and I kept repeating the last command when I actually wanted to do some magical incantation.

I learned about :m[ove] to move and :co[py] to copy lines. Good stuff.

dap and cap pairs are also useful from time to time. They just simply delete, or change, around the current paragraph.

Finally, I added the following bit to my .vimrc to highlight the current line:

augroup CursorLine
    au!
    au VimEnter,WinEnter,BufWinEnter * setlocal cursorline
    au WinLeave * setlocal nocursorline
augroup End

So, that’s pretty much it. I don’t think that I’m super fast navigating around in vim, but it’s definitely better than some 3 months ago.

Next thing I want to tackle is using registers, and especially macros.

And read more of that nice :help holy-grail.

Ack in vim

published on December 09, 2014.
Heads-up! You're reading an old post and the information in it is quite probably outdated.

I started using vim 3, 4 years ago. The way I use it is that I started out with no plugins and with a handful of lines in .vimrc. It is far too easy to cram all kind of stuff into it and then get lost in the myriads of key combinations. To prevent that, I decided to slowly add in bits and pieces I find lacking in my day to day usage of vim. Also allows me to first learn the editor and later the plugins.

Today was an exceptional day as I added not one, but two plugins to vim! And that is a big change for me as the total number of plugins I now use is 4.

The first one I added is ack.vim. It’s a nice little plugin to run ack from within vim and show the results in a split window. It’s rather easy to use, one just basically types :Ack search_string and that’s it. The one thing I immediately disliked is that it sort of gets lost in the subdirectories of a project.

A quick google search found a solution for that little problem as well: vim-rooter. It doesn’t do much, just changes the current working directory of vim to the project root when you open a file.

And that’s basically it. Nice and fast searching with ack from vim.

Tags: ack, vim, plugins, rooter.
Categories: Development, Software, Programming.
Robert Basic

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